What is on your desktop?

Over the years, I have noticed two types of computer users. Those with a neat, tidy and organized desktops and those whose desktops looks like a virtual tornado ripped through spewing files, folders and shortcuts from one corner of the screen to the other.  Unfortunately, most people don’t realize the value of an organized desktop.

While I can’t claim to be the most organized person in the world when it comes to the files on my computer, the one area I take pride in is my desktop.  I always keep as few items on my desktop as possible for two reasons.  I want to be able to find stuff quickly and easily as well as be able to see my constantly changing wallpaper in all its glory.

Unfortunately, this isn’t necessarily true about other areas of my hard drive, including the My Documents folder.  I am working on tidying up the other areas of my hard drives, but when you have 2.5TB of space, it can take a while.

With the background out of the way, I have come to the topic of ‘What is on your desktop?’  I usually try to keep only shortcuts on my desktop to games and programs that I use on a regular basis, such as Audacity, Firefox and Dreamweaver.  It is rare that I ever keep files or folders on my desktop unless they are for temporary use.

What is on your desktop?  Over the years, I have worked on many computers and find that people keep a wide array of stuff on their desktop.  I have seen people with icons to launch their dail-up internet, office software, games, music and more.  While its common to find a desktop with My Computer and the Recycle Bin, it is rare to find any other two desktops that are exactly alike.  What has always surprised me is when I find desktops that still have the bloatware icons from when the PC was purchased, even though its several years old.  It is also common to find icons to other programs that piggyback on freeware applications and games which waste valuable desktop real estate.

I have always advocated keeping a tidy desktop as it allows for quicker, more productive use of a computer.  While there is little change in how fast the computer boots up unless you are running a really old machine, having fewer items on your desktop allows for you to find what you want quickly and will give you those precious seconds you may need to complete some work at the office or get your homework in before the deadline.

While you desktop may be a tribute to your latest vacation, it can also be one of the cheapest, quickest ways to decrease clutter and increase productivity.

If that isn’t enough to convince you to clean your desktop, ask yourself what your desktop says about you when you have company over or take your computer into the repair shop.

Until next time, keep those desktops tidy and your productivity up!